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The Strategy Room

J.Crew Separates Brand and Persona, Consumer Data Privacy Changes, April Fools Stunts Not Quite Funny Anymore

By: Ashley Durkin-Rixey

Lunch Break April 4

Quick PR Reads You Can Tackle Between Bites

Happy Tuesday! The Lunch Break editorial staff is still pouring over the finale of Big Little Lies on HBO and celebrating the Stanton hub city baseball teams going three for four on opening day (C’mon Yankees).

In today’s edition, consumer privacy data law changes could be bad for marketers, J.Crew’s human brand identity exits, consumer data privacy changes may not be as great as marketers think, and Equal Pay Day is put front and center by Millennial women.

April Fools Isn’t So Funny Anymore

April Fools 2017 was a fairly low key day for a holiday that marketers and brands have come to cherish for a quick buzz. In the era of misinformation and “fake news,” Fast Company argues tech companies in particular may want to put their energy into better products and connecting with consumers by being socially responsible, not just impish.

In Jenna We Trust

Yesterday, J.Crew announced its longtime creative director Jenna Lyons is exiting the company at the end of the year. Not only is Lyons credited with the revival of the brand over her 26-year tenure, but her personal style is synonymous with J.Crew. How will the company move forward to establish their brand without the persona of Lyons? Time will tell.

Not So Fast Advertisers and Marketers

The recent vote by the U.S. House of Representatives to overturn consumer data privacy laws had ad and marketing groups cheering, but perhaps they should pause to consider the consequences. According to Campaign Live, the legal changes could increase consumer distrust in the industry and move data protection to the state level. This could leave a messy patchwork of individual regulations for the industry to navigate instead.

Equal Pay Mantle Taken Up by Millennials

Seeing red today? That’s because red is the color of a  little known day of advocacy for working women in the United States striving for equal pay. Continuing the momentum from the National Women’s March in January, this year’s Equal Pay Day is more high profile than ever. Forbes says Millennial women are the biggest driver behind this year’s observance. Millennials are not only purpose and change driven, they represent the largest number of working families today.




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