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The Strategy Room

Golden Globes, LinkedIn Marketing, A Hopeful Facebook, #TimesUp and more

By: Sonia Abdulbaki

Lunch Break January 9

QUICK PR READS YOU CAN TACKLE BETWEEN BITES

Happy Tuesday, Lunch Breakers! Even with the bomb cyclone winter storm gone, it was a gloomy, foggy morning in Washington, D.C. But we’re seeing the fog lift, and with it, marketing is taking on more honest campaigns in the era of post-truth and consumer distrust.

In this week’s edition, we’re talking LinkedIn and Facebook marketing, the Golden Globes, #TimesUp, and iPhone addiction.

Linked Together

LinkedIn has taken on a marketing campaign that integrates people. During the Golden Globes, the platform launched a campaign called “In It Together.” The professional network’s ad included a user who does not fit the white collar business profile the platform is known for. The initiative seeks to capture diverse professionals in their surroundings to celebrate different kinds of success.

Facebook Feels

Facebook’s new 60-second spot, “Worlds of Hope,” is getting up close and personal with people’s imperfections. The voiceovers leave in stutters and other speech nuances and create a warm and optimistic portrayal of diverse backgrounds and environments. Like LinkedIn’s campaign, this also aired during the Golden Globes. The campaign aims to celebrate community and work towards positive change. What’re you #HopefulFor?

#TimesUp

The Golden Globes was more than just an awards show this year. It was a chance for Hollywood to acknowledge the past year of sexual harassment allegations and to take social media movements to the next level. #MeToo inspired #TimesUp, a follow-up campaign initiated by women in Hollywood to form an anti-harassment action plan. With 3.3 million tweets about the Golden Globes, #TimesUp got 473,900 mentions. It looks like the #TimesUp for sexual harassment to go unspoken.

An Apple A Day…

Too much Apple, in this case, your iPhone, might not keep the doctor away. It’s a form of addiction, and two shareholders are raising concerns over child development and whether this will harm the future market value of the company. Investors are saying the addictive nature of gadgets are the reason tech companies are thriving.




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