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The Strategy Room

Chuck E. Cheese Deception, COVID-19 Product Resurgence, Cringeworthy Intros & More.

By: Adam Yosim

QUICK PR READS YOU CAN TACKLE BETWEEN BITES

Happy Wednesday, Lunch Breakers! We’re looking at the bright side following a three-day holiday weekend – only two more days until Friday!

In this week’s edition, we’re pulling back the curtain on some chain restaurant switcheroos, taking a look at COVID-19 product revivals and showcasing ways to fine-tune your media outreach strategy during the pandemic.

 Same Food. Different Name.

The hard-hit restaurant industry continues to try to stay afloat during the COVID-19 pandemic. Patrons are doing their part to support local eateries during these troubling times, but there are a some confused customers who ordered from Pasqually’s Pizza & Wings, Rotisserie Roast or Neighborhood Wings. If those names don’t ring a bell, you might be familiar with their actual names: Chuck E. Cheese, Boston Market and Applebees. It’s part of a growing trend of chain restaurants trying out new concepts and menu items as “virtual restaurants” on Grubhub and other delivery apps.

Napkins Are Dead. Long Live Napkins!

What do napkins, American cheese and golf have in common? They’re three items that fell out of favor thanks to Millennials. As Adage explains, a shift in pandemic purchasing decisions has led to a COVID-19 resurgence in these products and others. Come for the avocado toast-to-cereal shift and stay for the bulking up of microbrewery beer.

Re-Thinking Your Pitch Intro

As PR professionals, we all understand the importance of first impressions. Worried that you’re scaring away potential reporters from connecting with your clients? You might want to revisit the opening line of your pitch. Check out these eight types of first sentences to avoid, including some that are downright cringeworthy.

Pandemic Pitching Pandemonium

For a double dose of media relations mastery, here’s Michael Smart’s 6 types of tweets from frustrated reporters. Nobody wants to be on the receiving end of this popular method of PR public shaming, but it’s important to not get dissuaded. As long as you’re taking a nuanced and targeted approach to your pitching, it’s fine to stay the course and continue to provide newsworthy story ideas while being empathetic during this pandemic.

 




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